Archive for the 'Wildlife in Cornwall' Category

Make sure you are all sitting down….. it’s the Isles of Scilly honeymoon pictures!

0025Isles Of Scilly-ML-IMG_0073

We are delighted to be celebrating our first year wedding anniversary tomorrow and I though it was about time to put some of our honeymoon pictures on one of our blogs! So if you head over to www.acornishcoastalwedding.com  (our wedding blog) you will see them.

Go grab yourself a cuppa tea and a piece of Saffron cake and enjoy the pictures!

M&B

 

 

The Waymarker and a great Sunday afternoon…

With a recent visit to Cornwall planned to see my parents they thought it would be nice to take us out for a Sunday roast. All we had to do was suggest somewhere to go? I jumped on the computer and typed in ‘Best Roast in Falmouth’ and at the top of the Google results was a review which rated The Waymarker between Falmouth and Gweek highly. Trip Advisor has a few reviews on The Waymarker  and upon reading them I thought it was definitely worth a go.

So, after a quick call to Mum and Dad who said ‘Oh yes that’s Paul Mann’s relative who runs it – we’ve passed it by but never been in there. Shall we give it a go?’

After a quick email it was all booked up for 1pm Sunday. Well, what a Cornish Gem – The Waymarker is a timber frame construction built in a tranquil old granite quarry at Trewardreva, Constantine. With beautiful countryside surrounding the building and plenty of outside seating I imagine it would be a great place to stop off to relax on a warm and sunny day. We opted for the more civilised indoor seating arrangement as we were having a cooked meal. After hearing the rave reviews online we decided to all go for the roast beef.

Whilst we waited for the meal my parents had a couple of shandies and Becky and I thought we could try some local beverages. Becky went for an Elderflower Presse made in Duloe by Cornish Orchards while I went for a more alcoholic option of a real ale. Lizard Ales of Coverack, on the Lizard peninsula brew half a dozen different ales in an old nuclear bunker and I opted for  the classically named Kernow Gold. A cracking light and refreshing ale suitable for lunchtime drinking.

With the drinks going down well, it was not long before our meals arrived. Wow, they looked mouth-watering! It transpires that Rhiannon who runs The Waymarker is a farmer’s daughter. That combination of farmers daughter and cooking will usually result in a hearty meal especially when roast Beef and fresh veg is concerned! It was a really great meal, friendly service and an idyllic location. So if you are in the area, its well worth trying this little gem tucked away off the beaten track between Falmouth and Gweek.

After that delicious meal we had to try to walk some of it off so headed for the Penrose Estate to walk down to Loe Bar via Loe Pool.

Loe Pool is a fresh water lake located on the Penrose Estate with a shingle bank  separating it from the sea. Measuring 50 Hectares (500,000 sq metres) it’s quite a large lake that we later realised.

Becky and I headed off as my parents wanted to take a more leisurely stroll and not walk all the way to the sea. It’s a ride I have done on my bike before but never on foot – Dad did say its a ‘Hell of a walk’  – He was right! After a 40 minute walk we realised just how much further we would have to walk around Loe pool before then turning around and walking all the way back. Not wanting to keep Mum and Dad waiting too long we turned around and headed back with the idea of driving to Loe Bar car park and walking along the clifftop to see the bar, the pool and the sea.

The scenery around the pool, the bar and the south Cornish coastline is just stunning. The clear blue skies and the fresh vegetation were just glorious. Its well worth a walk for the able-bodied person, next time we will plan to take all day to do the walk and take a lunch with us to have on the beach (bar).

A word of warning. Do not attempt to go into the sea on Loe Bar, there are very dangerous under currents here coupled with the steep shingle bank which acts like quicksand so do not even consider stepping foot in the water. Several lives have been lost along this stretch of coastline. So be safe and keep out of the water! The dangerous swimming conditions and remoteness keep this beautiful beach off the bucket & spade brigades go to lists – excellent. Check out how quiet it is on a Sunday afternoon!

Here are some of my favourite pictures taken that day

 

We finally got back to Falmouth, where we went up to Pendennis Point to admire the view…… and have a Mr Whippy too!

A CORNISH FOLK SONG by R S Hawker

Tonight as I hear the bells ringing in the church down the road (its bell practise night! nothing eerie…) and before the owl starts hooting in the tree outside our window I was reminded of this poem by the Reverend Robert Stephen Hawker (1803 -1875) titled A Cornish Folk Song

Now, of all the birds that keep the tree,
Which is the wittiest fowl?
Oh, the Cuckoo—the Cuckoo’s the one!—for he
Is wiser than the owl!

He dresses his wife in her Sunday’s best,
And they never have rent to pay;
For she folds her feathers in a neighbours’s nest,
And thither she goes to lay!

He winked with his eye, and he buttoned his purse,
When the breeding time began;
For he’d put his children out to nurse
In the house of another man!

Then his child, though born in a stranger’s bed,
Is his own true father’s son;
For he gobbles the lawful childrens’s bread,
And he starves them one by one!

So, of all the birds that keep the tree,
This is the wittiest fowl!
Oh, the Cuckoo—the Cuckoo’s the one!—for he
Is wiser than the owl!

Vicar of Morwenstow - R S Hawker

Kennall Vale Nature Reserve

If you are looking for somewhere to walk off those mince pies after Christmas or in my case before Christmas then take a walk around Kennall Vale.

Old mill stone lies next to the River Kennall.

Situated between Redruth and Falmouth in the village of Ponsanooth, Kennall Vale is part of Cornwall’s rich heritage from the Tin mining era. Gunpowder was produced here with production starting around 1812. By 1860 some 50 men were employed in the gunpowder ‘factory’ until its closure in the early 1900s when alternative and more sophisticated methods of explosives were used in the Cornish mines.

Kennall Vale is now a tranquil and serene place to have a quiet walk and is very popular with dog walkers. The valley has a river (The Kennall!) running through it which would have provided the power to work the machines within the gunpowder mills.  Now,  just lies the ruins of the old granite buildings and parts of the cast iron wheels which once turned.

A walk around Kennel Vale is not for the faint hearted, it starts off with a nice wide even path with a slight gradient going under the canopy of large beech trees, as you walk along you can hear the water running in the nearby river but it’s not until about half a mile before you experience the whole drama of this amazing place. As you pass some old buildings and the old quarry on you left hand side (from where the granite was taken to build all the mills)  now filled with water you will turn a corner and the footpath then crosses the river (via a bridge). Take time to stop on the bridge and watch and listen to the incredible power of the water beneath you. As you walk across you will see many waterfalls in front from where the water was channelled down to drive other parts of the mills workings. Take care now along this path as you walk back along the river from the other side. This path is narrow, muddy, slippery, and everything you didn’t want to hear! But it all adds to a fantastic experience, as you wonder back imagining what it must have been like to work in such a place – producing gunpowder too!

And yes finally, for those who are interested in any gunpowder incidents which happened at Kennall Vale click on the worldheritagecornwall.com.

It’s a great walk, will take an average able-bodied person around 45 minutes  – 1 hour to do the circuit and it certainly burn off a few mince pies. –  Just remember to leave those cigarettes in the car!

New Series – Cornwall on TV

With many programs on TV recently showcasing Cornwall I though I would start a new series called Cornwall on TV.

So if you see this symbol you know that Cornwall has been on the TV recently!

So first up is an episode of Autumn Watch BBC 2  on TV last week, 11th November where Martin Hughes-Games went to the National Lobster Hatchery in Padstow. Read their Rock Blogster antics here. Whilst Martin was on the show he mentioned the sighting of many Turnstones on the quay at Padstow. Turnstones are small birds that similarly to seagulls now pace up and down between pasty eating emmets looking for scraps of food. They are heavily rewarded by the fine pickings they scavenge making it much easier than having to ‘turn stones’ looking for food as their name suggests.

On Autumn watch Martin mentioned their feeding habits of finding food and also some of the more unsavoury nibbles they have eaten of which I will not be mentioning on the tastefully named MySaffronBun. All I can say is filthy!

Here in an innocent little chap waiting for a little bit of Mr Steins titbits off the quay in Padstow.

To find out more about Turnstones check out the RSPB website here

 


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