Archive for the 'Stories' Category



Memories of fishermen, Polperro.

If you fancy looking at a video of Cornwall in Days gone by then take a look at this great video put together by Robert Hocking of Cornish Voices.  Great interview by  father and son Ken and Tony Pengelly reminising of tales around Polperro. More entertaining than the Only way is Essex anyday!

 

Whatever happened to the beach balls?

Ever wondered what happens to those beach balls that are not sold at the end of the season?

I doubt it has ever crossed your mind… but the shocking news it that most of them are forced to work at sea, tied in nets in confined spaces with others and thrown overboard! Left to bob up and down in the hope that one day they will be rescued.

Cornish Tribute found in Oxfordshire Public House!

What happens when a Cornish man walks (in a straight line) into an Oxfordshire Pub and sees Tribute on tap at the bar?

He leaves several hours later with a big smile on his face (in a less straight line)

That’s what happened this Saturday just gone when I was out with the Cuxham Cricket lads for our end of season supper at The Plough in Great Haseley.  I walked into the pub, said my ‘Hellos’ then went to the bar to choose a beverage. ‘Ahh, wonder what ales they have on tap’ knowing I was not in a Breakspears pub. My eyes jumped out of my head when I read  the words TRIBUTE and St Austell Brewery. So when the barmaid asked ‘what will it be? I proudly said ‘A pint of TRIBUTE please me ansome‘ .(I never said that last bit!)

So after a few more, some wine and then some port it all became a rather memorable and then later unmemorable night! Enough said!

So, What about the old Tribute? Well, I have loved Tribute for some years and without being to prejudiced it has to be one of my favourite beers. A pale ale with some zesty fruity notes it’s a great accompaniment to a meal without being too heavy or bitter.

To find out more about Tribute Ale and St Austell Brewery click here and if you are looking for a great present to send someone this Christmas then why not send them a keg or a selection of fine Cornish ales by visiting the St Austell Brewery online shop here.

 

 

 

 

 

Making a Proper Cornish Pasty

It’s that time of the year, the nights are drawing in and all we want is some comfort food. Reminiscing about that lovely holiday you had in Cornwall; strolling the streets or sitting on the beach with a pasty in your hand? Well, why not try and make your own this weekend?

Made the traditional way by my Mum for her family all her life, why not give her recipe a go. You will not find any dodgy fillings such as Stilton or chicken tikka here; just good old meat, potato, onion and swede!

So first you need to make some pastry – Cornish Housewife Tip No1 – Mum always makes her own and then freezes it as it will give you a better  texture to the pasty.

Ingredients for making Mum’s pastry

I.5 kg plain flour

500g Lard and Margarine Mix (approx 2/3 Lard and 1/3 Margarine)

Cut fat into flour and then rub together until it is similar to breadcrumbs.

Mix together with cold water until it is a firm dough consistency and set aside ready for making pasties or freeze until ready to use.

Making the Pasties

The quantities will depend on the size of the pasty you are making! These ingredients are based on an average sized pasty.

1 onion

1 piece of swede (or Turnip as we like to call it in Cornwall)

potatoes

diced beef skirt (approx 150g)

salt and pepper to season

Sprinkle flour on work surface or board. Roll out pastry to about 5mm and place a dinner plate on pastry and cut around it leaving a circle. Put rolling-pin underneath half way so half of the pastry is over the rolling-pin and the other half is flat on the work top (Cornish Housewife Tip No 2)

Add a layer of swede, a little bit of onion, finely slice potato onto the layer of onion, add layer of skirt, season with salt and pepper, add more onion and finish with a layer of potato. Fold over and crimp pastry. Coat pastry with egg to help brown in oven to give it that lovely golden colour. Cornish Housewife Tip No 3 – Pierce small hole in top for the steam to escape so the pastry does not split.

Mum always adds an initial made from pastry for each family member if any have special requirements (for example I like quite a lot of pepper in mine!)

Bake in a hot oven (220 oC) for one hour turning it back to 180 oC as it cooks, then turning it down to 150 oC  for the last 10 minutes. These timing will depend on your oven but are a rough guide to start with.

Remove the pasty from the oven and serve hot with a pickled onion and a cuppa tea!

Here is a pasty mum made for Becky a few months ago, the afore-mentioned pasty then travelled back to Oxfordshire where it was devoured.

Becky's Pasty, Why the 'R' - you had better watch the video!

And my reluctant mum let me film her making this actual pasty so the secret to her success is out there! Apologies for the ropey video and noise from the lens zoom but together with the method above it will give you a good idea of how to make one. If anyone makes one please send me a picture and I will happily showcase your efforts! mysaffronbun@gmail.com

One of the best pasty shops in Cornwall is called Ann’s Pasties and is based on the Lizard. Why not give Ann’s pasties a go by ordering some online here.

Reggie

I took this series of pictures many years ago of Reggie Ingleheart.  Reggie was the youngest of 10 children and lived on Merrymit Farm, Budock. He worked on his father’s farm and had a small market garden which he supplied various shops in Falmouth with fresh veg and flowers.

He kept a small roost of pigeons and doves which would always be circling our garden. The cotes were pretty dilapidated in his back garden and an old Morris Minor sat in the corner rotting away. One of my first projects  was photographing the villagers of Budock Water and Reggie was one of my first targets I took some great shots of him feeding his doves which I may be able to find to include in a future post.  These are a few images from a session I shot a few years later. This is just a scan from a contact sheet of pictures taken on my old Mamiya but I love his expression and the memories that come back of my childhood walking past Reggie’s house.

Anyone for a Mr Whippy?

A blast from the past tonight with a picture I took during my college days. Going around Pendennis Point for the zillionth time with my mates we  stopped off to admire the view!! I bleak day and not a soul in sight, even the ice cream seller has done a runner.

A Cornish Tacker

When I moved up-country some 12 years ago I worked in a photographic portrait studio in Marlow, Bucks. The main part of the business was photographing families and most of those were what was described as a FG1, a family group where the oldest child was less than 6. Quite often, on going up stairs to the offices and digital rooms your colleagues would ask how the session went. They had more often than not heard children rampaging around the studio beneath screaming at the tops of their voices for the last hour whilst they sat there retouching images, drinking coffee and listening to music.  With the sweat dripping off my brow, I would calmly say ‘fine, got some good shots’ as I downloaded my images in the hope it was not a reshoot. ‘What did you have? they asked. ‘O just a couple of tackers’ I would say.

Oblivious to what I was on about eventually one day someone said ‘Tacker? What is that?’

‘Small child!’ I said. ‘Ive never heard you say that before’ came the response. Convinced I had being using the term ‘tacker’ for year I explained that I called a small child a tacker. It turns out this is a Cornish phrase and I didn’t realise it was not part of the Queens English. Surely Prince Charles has been refered to by his parents as a little tacker!?

So, in doing a bit of research for you I have learned that a Tacker is in fact a small boy up to the age of about 10. It is now a term I have dropped from my vocabulary due to many confused looks from those up-country folk.


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